woman left with facial burns after headphones explode mid-flight - small lithium ion battery

by:MERITSUN     2019-11-22
woman left with facial burns after headphones explode mid-flight  -  small lithium ion battery
The explosive battery in a set of headphones burned a woman's face, hands and hair because she was blown up in a long push dozhaul flight.
Two hours after the trip from Beijing to Melbourne, passengers were woken up by the noise of the explosion and tore their heads off their ears.
The headphones were on fire and began to melt.
The unidentified passenger told the Australian transport security agency that she was listening to music when the explosion occurred.
"When I turned around, I felt burning on my face," she said.
I just grabbed my face and caused the headphones to wrap around my neck.
"I continued to feel hot, so I took them down and threw them on the floor.
They were lit and had a small amount of fire.
"When I went to step on their feet, the flight attendant had already poured a bucket of water on them.
They put them in the barrel at the back of the plane.
"In the remaining 11 years, the smell of melted plastic, burnt electronics and burnt hair hung over passengers --
The lady said an hour flight.
She added: "People are coughing and choking all the way home.
The explosion caused blisters on the woman's hands and a black face, prompting Australian authorities to warn of the danger of using batteries.
Power supplies on flights.
Batteries should be kept in proper loading unless in use and spare parts must be stored in carry
ATSB said it was on the luggage.
They added: "If the passenger's smartphone or other device falls into the seat gap, find their device before moving the electric seat. “[And]
If passengers cannot find their equipment, they should avoid moving their seats and contact the crew immediately.
ATSB's report does not mention the brand of the headset, but investigators believe that the fault of lithium
Ion batteries are a possible reason.
In recent years, there have been some problems with lithium batteries on flights.
Last year, a plane that took off from Sydney was forced to stop because smoke was seen in a hand luggage.
Later, it was found that a lithium battery caught fire in the luggage.
ATSB said that when a device is pressed under a mobile seat in the United States, it also smokes up.
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